HOME.jpg ALBUMS.jpg LYRICS.jpg ARTICLES.jpg TV.jpg BOOKS.jpg
FORUM1.jpg SINGLES.jpg VIDEOS.jpg FANZINES.jpg RADIO.jpg MERCHANDISE.jpg


GIGOGRAPHY.jpg
198619871988198919901991199219931994199519961997199819992000200120022003200420052006200720082009201020112012201320142015201620172018201920202021202220232024

Twitter X Rounded Icon.pngFacebook-icon.jpgInstagram-icon.jpgThreads-icon.jpgYouTube logo.png

Víctor Jara Honoured By James Dean Bradfield - Página/12, 1st November 2020

From MSPpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
ARTICLES:2020



Title: Víctor Jara Honoured By James Dean Bradfield
Publication: Página/12
Date: Sunday 1st November 2020
Writer: Claudio Pombinho



The Manic Street Preachers singer released Even in exile, an album based on the life and work of the Chilean myth.

It is the voice of the most political, reflective and confrontational British band on the British scene, the Welsh Manic Street Preachers, owners of a personal mythology that ranges from being the first rock band to play in Cuba to having gone through the disappearance of its member most iconic, guitarist and lyricist Richey Edwards. Now James Dean Bradfield decided to undertake a solo project based on one of his heroes: a tribute album to Víctor Jara. Even in Exile is a collection of beautiful original songs inspired by the life and work of the Chilean singer-songwriter, an album that in the week of its release reached the first position in the ranking of British independent albums and that is the result of a work of two years that was born from a series of texts by the poet and playwright Patrick Jones, brother of Nicky Wire, Bass player for the Manics and fan of Jara. A story that begins in Wales in the '80s, when young rockers heard a song by The Clash that named Jara in a town destroyed by Margaret Thatcher's policies and ends today with the plesbicito for the new Constitution of Chile, a Plaza Dignidad full and a future as hopeful as it is uncertain.

Perhaps he was already beginning to imagine something of what was to come, the truth is that James Dean Bradfield was still a teenager with thick glasses obtained through the British national health service when he heard the name of Víctor Jara in a song by The Clash. It was 1984 in Blackwood, one of the many mining towns in South Wales devastated by Margaret Thatcher's policies, and rock was for him an essential part of a sentimental education he had with a handful of friends between old books and plans to escape. A couple of years later they decided to start their own band, and the rest is known history. The Manic Street Preachers crossed the macho culture and the airs of defeat of their people with glam shadows, covered with skin, provocative words painted in stencil on T-shirts and ski masks with the name written on the forehead as on a smock. Four low-caste kamikazes armed with aggressive riffs and lyrics created with pens and erasures in a cut-up of quotes about cinema, literature, references to the holocaust, anorexia, the Spanish civil war, a duet with the star Traci Lords porn or harangues against the main banks of their country: the goal was absolute and victory had to be absolute. They soon realized that they would not be as famous as the Sex Pistols, but that did not stop more than three decades from passing with their own epics, tragedies and reinventions for the band, that found a way to survive the disappearance of the most idolized of its members and years later became head of the main festivals in Great Britain and the first British rock band to play on Cuban soil. A path, finally, as imaginable as any impossible.

Today the father of two teenagers, Bradfield decided to take up the message he received from the Clash in his own adolescence to pay tribute to Víctor Jara in a big way with Even in exile , his second solo work and the first in English with all original songs inspired by the life and work of the Chilean singer-songwriter. An album that in the week of its release reached number one in the ranking of British independent albums and that, far from an improvised tribute, is the result of a two-year work that was born from a series of texts by the poet and playwright Patrick Jones, also a teenage friend of Bradfield and brother of Nicky Wire, bassist for the Manics. And there is more. The album was accompanied on its release by Inspired by Jara, a three-episode podcast where Bradfield reviews the life of Víctor Jara and interviews artists from different disciplines inspired by the Chilean singer-songwriter and theater director, from actress Emma Thompson to choreographer Christopher Bruce or singer-songwriter Joey Burns from Calexico. "Jara's work is of a beauty unlike anything else," says Bradfield on the podcast. “Over the years he became a guide to follow around the world, a guy who created a fascinating work in a period in South America where the right wing was rampant. And even near his end, when he suspected everything to come, his music was still something full of grace. That really impressed me. It taught me that there is always something new to do with a song.

Even in exile is part of a long tradition of tributes that Víctor Jara received in the last forty-seven years around the world, from a ballet created by a British choreographer to a Russian rock opera, a German biopic, compositions and versions of Belgian and Turkish artists , Japanese, French, Swedes, Basques, a three-day Welsh festival that every two years celebrates his legacy or even the name of an asteroid named after him by a Soviet astronomer. In Great Britain and the United States, tributes to the son of peasants raised in Lonquén multiplied among bands and artists as popular as The Clash, Robert Wyatt, Joan Baez, Bruce Springsteen, Simple Minds, Peter Gabriel, Roger Waters or U2, and recently the Fleet Foxes included a song called "Jara" on their brand new album Shore. But even in this context, Even in exile appears as a rarity, the first album by a rock star entirely dedicated to the Chilean singer-songwriter and theater director.

"At first it happened by chance," says the author on the podcast. “Patrick had found the Manifesto disk in a used store. He liked it so much that he ended up immersing himself fully in Jara's life and writing some texts inspired by him. One day when I was visiting his house, I asked him what he was up to and he showed me those poems, which he had no intention of publishing. Since that song from The Clash, back in 1984, I had heard Jara's name again many times and was aware of the tragic arc of her story, but I did not know her music, and I was fascinated. He was by far the musician I listened to the most in these two years. His songs are like an enchantment, an almost spiritual call to Chile that he had in his heart and mind ”.

Perhaps he was already beginning to imagine something of what was to come, the truth is that James Dean Bradfield was still a teenager with thick glasses obtained through the British national health service when he heard the name of Víctor Jara in a song by The Clash. It was 1984 in Blackwood, one of the many mining towns in South Wales devastated by Margaret Thatcher's policies, and rock was for him an essential part of a sentimental education he had with a handful of friends between old books and plans to escape. A couple of years later they decided to start their own band, and the rest is known history. The Manic Street Preachers crossed the macho culture and the airs of defeat of their people with glam shadows, covered with skin, provocative words painted in stencil on T-shirts and ski masks with the name written on the forehead as on a smock. Four low-caste kamikazes armed with aggressive riffs and lyrics created with pens and erasures in a cut-up of quotes about cinema, literature, references to the holocaust, anorexia, the Spanish civil war, a duet with the star Traci Lords porn or harangues against the main banks of their country: the goal was absolute and victory had to be absolute. They soon realized that they would not be as famous as the Sex Pistols, but that did not stop more than three decades from passing with their own epics, tragedies and reinventions for the band, that found a way to survive the disappearance of the most idolized of its members and years later became head of the main festivals in Great Britain and the first British rock band to play on Cuban soil. A path, finally, as imaginable as any impossible.

Which Buenos Aires municipalities will have nighttime restrictions? | The new provisions, point by point Today the father of two teenagers, Bradfield decided to take up the message he received from the Clash in his own adolescence to pay tribute to Víctor Jara in a big way with Even in exile , his second solo work and the first in English with all original songs inspired by the life and work of the Chilean singer-songwriter. An album that in the week of its release reached number one in the ranking of British independent albums and that, far from an improvised tribute, is the result of a two-year work that was born from a series of texts by the poet and playwright Patrick Jones, also a teenage friend of Bradfield and brother of Nicky Wire, bassist for the Manics. And there is more. The album was accompanied on its release by Inspired by Jara, a three-episode podcast where Bradfield reviews the life of Víctor Jara and interviews artists from different disciplines inspired by the Chilean singer-songwriter and theater director, from actress Emma Thompson to choreographer Christopher Bruce or singer-songwriter Joey Burns from Calexico. "Jara's work is of a beauty unlike anything else," says Bradfield on the podcast. “Over the years he became a guide to follow around the world, a guy who created a fascinating work in a period in South America where the right wing was rampant. And even near his end, when he suspected everything to come, his music was still something full of grace. That really impressed me. It taught me that there is always something new to do with a song.

Even in exile is part of a long tradition of tributes that Víctor Jara received in the last forty-seven years around the world, from a ballet created by a British choreographer to a Russian rock opera, a German biopic, compositions and versions of Belgian and Turkish artists , Japanese, French, Swedes, Basques, a three-day Welsh festival that every two years celebrates his legacy or even the name of an asteroid named after him by a Soviet astronomer. In Great Britain and the United States, tributes to the son of peasants raised in Lonquén multiplied among bands and artists as popular as The Clash, Robert Wyatt, Joan Baez, Bruce Springsteen, Simple Minds, Peter Gabriel, Roger Waters or U2, and recently the Fleet Foxes included a song called "Jara" on their brand new album Shore. But even in this context, Even in exile appears as a rarity, the first album by a rock star entirely dedicated to the Chilean singer-songwriter and theater director.

"At first it happened by chance," says the author on the podcast. “Patrick had found the Manifesto disk in a used store. He liked it so much that he ended up immersing himself fully in Jara's life and writing some texts inspired by him. One day when I was visiting his house, I asked him what he was up to and he showed me those poems, which he had no intention of publishing. Since that song from The Clash, back in 1984, I had heard Jara's name again many times and was aware of the tragic arc of her story, but I did not know her music, and I was fascinated. He was by far the musician I listened to the most in these two years. His songs are like an enchantment, an almost spiritual call to Chile that he had in his heart and mind ”.

The album does not set out to venture into the musical fields of Jara: in Bradfield's words, for this work he took things from Rush, Pink Floyd, John Cale, the Super Furry Animals or Morricone. In any case, its influence is manifested in a calm tone of voice that in many songs blends with the rock line for stadiums with good melodies and careful arrangements of the last Manics album, Resistance is futile , released in 2018. The first song , "Remember", quotes from its title the lyrics of "Washington Bullets", the one from The Clash in which Bradfield first heard the name Jara, and from then on it continues through eleven songs in a narrative journey that addresses different aspects of his life. The tension and sordid environments in “There Will Come a War” and “Thirty Thousand Milk Bottles” portray the pre-coup and post-coup climate. "Under the Mimosa Tree" flies over Jara's family life, while three central songs on the album point to the influence that women had on his life. "The Boy from the Plantation" chronicles the connection with his mother, a singer herself at parties and wakes, who passed away when the singer-songwriter was just a teenager.An unfinished song .

"The women in his life have a huge influence on this record," Bradfield noted in a recent interview. “Understanding the stories of Joan, Violeta and her mother Amanda is key to understanding Víctor. The fact that he grew up listening to his mother sing and play the guitar, the influence of Violeta Parra's compositions, the beauty of the choreographies that Joan performed, all of this had a very great impact on him. It was a difficult job preparing the album with Patrick and trying to connect with that essence without imitating him or simply covering his songs, and I approached his work and Patrick's poetry with the same almost sick care that I always had when creating music for the lyrics. that my bandmates passed me. In the end, the fear of spoiling everything always led me to outperform myself more than any other motivation”.

The question unleashed the laughter of everyone, band, ministers, assistants and press media covering the meeting: "More noise than in the war?", Fidel Castro quickly released at 74 years of age when Bradfield warned him that they were going to make a lot of noise during the Manic Street Preachers show in Havana. It was on February 17, 2001, a milestone that for the Welsh trio would crown the ambition of its beginnings - when there were four of them - to return rock to the political arenas amid the generational apathy of the nineties. An epic born from the chaotic and brilliant mind of Richey Edwards, a graduate in political history, lyricist, second guitarist (although he didn't know how to play much) and, as they called him themselves, the band's minister of propaganda.The Holy Bible , today considered one of the most important of the nineties in Britain and one of the darkest and most confrontational swan songs in rock history: “The sound of a band accelerating towards its own Armageddon”, was described by the biographer Simon Price. That disappearance remains a mystery to this day. Six months after publishing The Holy BibleAfter a brief stay in a psychiatric hospital due to his severe depressive tendencies, Richey gave a friend a novel whose introduction told the story of its author, who had disappeared without a trace after being admitted to a psychiatric hospital. The following night he traveled by taxi to a gas station near a bridge over the River Severn - known for the number of suicides that took place there - and then no one heard from him again. Then the myth began. Some fans said they saw it in a bar in the Canary Islands, others in a market in India. After intense police searches encouraged by his family, Richey was pronounced dead in 2008.

Until their disappearance, the Manics had been dissenters from whatever space they were intended to be located in. In the first interviews they assured that two of their great influences were Guns N 'Roses and the under Londoners with political lyrics McCarthy (a band from which Tim Gane and Laetitia Sadier from Stereolab left), at the same time that they fired at all the moves greatest British of their generation, be it the shoegaze, the madchester or the britpop. But after Richey's disappearance, the intention was also to take everything to an extreme that even escaped the control of the band. Nicky Wire (the closest to him, to the point that they were called "The Glamor Twins") took over the lyrics thereafter, and in 1996 the Manic Street Preachers returned with Everything must go.(Everything must go). From the title of the album, the sounds of water with which the album opened and the name of the first song, "Elvis Impersonator" ("Elvis Imitator"), the now trio made it clear the place that the band would occupy for them without Richey. The second track from that album, “A Design for Life”,was the first one they composed after his disappearance: "Libraries gave us power / and work made us free / what is the price now / for an empty piece of dignity?", the theme started, while the following song, " Kevin Carter, ”addressed the story of a Pulitzer-winning photographer who took his life after being criticized for taking a photo rather than intervening in the face of potential tragedy. In just three songs the band took charge of its present, past and future with that fierce lucidity of always where the political and the personal merged with pain, anger and pop culture, adding the emotional force unleashed by its history and the inevitable readings that would seek Richey in every song.

Everything must go was a hinge. The marginal stripes changed for nominations and awards at the MTV Music Awards or the Mercury Prize and became the main act of festivals such as Glastonbury, without for that reason deviating from the path they had taken until then, something that allowed them to put in January of the 2000 a number one spot with a single called "The Masses Against the Classes" (which starts with a Chomsky quote and ends with a Camus quote) and a few years later to record a guitar version of Rihanna's hit "Umbrella" as a B-side. of the successful Send away the tigers . The definitive exorcism of his past came in 2009 with Journal for plague lovers, produced by Steve Albini and composed from lyrics by Richey that they had preserved. Thereafter the band entered their third decade determined to embark on a new reinvention, starting with the ambitious and liberating Postcards from a young man (featuring Ian McCulloch and Duff McKagan), venturing into folk and soul with veins pop by Rewind the film (with Cate Le Bon as a guest) or surrendering to optimism without losing critical eyes in Futurology , inspired by the art and music they discovered in their travels around the world. "At first we were two sides that complemented each other," Bradfield once said. “On the one hand there were Richey and Nicky, who wanted to explode into a single album and then disarm the band, and on the other there were Sean (Moore, his cousin, the band's drummer) and I, who liked to think about a career extensive as musicians. As difficult as it was, it felt good when we decided to continue in the mid-nineties. " Like The Great Western , Bradfield's previous solo album, released fourteen years ago, Even in exileappears in the middle of a pause the Manic Street Preachers took before going in to record their next work. "Nick and Sean wanted to take a break, but I can't," he said. “I am an institutionalized musician, just thinking about doing nothing gave me a panic attack. When Patrick showed me the poems about Jara, I felt that I could turn them into a conceptual album. That's when I got fully into his world.

Even in exile includes a single song by Víctor Jara, “La Partida”, one of his most covered songs despite being instrumental. But this is not surprising. Beyond his natural capacity for melodies and arrangements, Jara was always concerned about the musical quality of his work, and his training as a theater director led him to make the most of the resources available so that the setting of each piece could recreate the ideal climate of the stories he chose to tell (perhaps the greatest example in that sense is his album La Population , a conceptual work about a shot influenced by Sgt. Pepper in terms of the creative use of the recording studio). "La Partida" belongs to The right to live in peace, the first album to include electric guitars and keyboards. For this, the participation of Los Blops, a baroque folk psychedelic group for which Jara had interceded a year before was fundamental when the record company of the Communist Youth, fundamental for the dissemination of the New Chilean Song, had refused to finance their album because in the band's lyrics had no explicit references to the popular revolution. Jara not only managed to get Los Blops to publish their first album there but also invited them to be the band that would help him electrify his sound. "La Partida", third track of El Derecho ..., is a call to courage that is both ethereal and forceful, two arpeggiated chords to the charango that resonate dreamlike in their variations of intensity and a dry punk strum of fury contained in the middle. A composition that would be taken up in a memorable version by the Inti Illimani two years after the kidnapping and murder of Jara, when they performed it live on Italian television (the film record of that version is on YouTube).

Bradfield's version is more bombastic, it highlights the original's spaghetti western aura and even in its different layers of arrangements it is more akin to that stadium rock that the Welshman is fond of. In the podcast he says: “I decided on that song because his words and his voice have such a great burden that I felt that I should not get there, but I wanted to include a piece of his. I tried to sing 'Manifesto' and 'I Remember Amanda', among others, but each time the result left me discouraged. He listened to me and felt like an empty container, and that's when I decided to record this song. The instruments of the original, the charango, the tiple, the quena, have a somewhat sad tone that in this version I decided to amplify to reach a more spectral vision, to call it somehow. There is a photo of Jara in the Temple of the Three Windows in Machu Picchu that was taken on his last tour of Peru, shortly before his murder. The image is impressive, and it was my biggest inspiration for the song."

"Santiago Sunrise", the song that closes Even in exile, was in turn the last one he recorded for the album. He did so while following the massive protests that took place in Chile a year ago, which led to the historic victory in last Sunday's plebiscite in favor of reforming the constitution inherited from the dictatorship. "Your spirit will guide us to Plaza Italia" ("Your spirit will guide us to Plaza Italia"), is heard on the final album. “Seeing so many people singing and playing Victor Jara songs in the street was really exciting,” said Bradfield. “Protest music is usually confrontational, but their thing is not protest music. It is something else. Beauty infiltrated the political trenches. That led me to try to communicate with other people instead of just confronting, and in this era where the opposition to the right is so divided it seemed important to me to write about him, someone who sought to unite rather than separate. In the end it may be hopeful, right? Something that comes from so many years ago and leaves such a big mark on a cynical old bastard like me ”.


El cantante de Manic Street Preachers editó Even in exile, un disco basado en la vida y la obra del mito chileno.

Es la voz de la banda británica mas política, reflexiva y confrontativa de la escena británica, los galeses Manic Street Preachers, dueños de una mitología personal que va desde ser la primera banda de rock que tocó en Cuba a haber atravesado la desaparición de su integrante más icónico, el guitarrista y letrista Richey Edwards. Ahora James Dean Bradfield decidió encarar un proyecto solista a partir de uno de sus héroes: un disco homenaje a Víctor Jara. Even in Exile es una colección de hermosas canciones originales inspiradas por la vida y obra del cantautor chileno, un álbum que en la semana de su lanzamiento alcanzó el primer puesto en el ranking de álbumes independientes británicos y que es el resultado de un trabajo de dos años que nació a partir de una serie de textos del poeta y dramaturgo Patrick Jones, hermano de Nicky Wire, bajista de los Manics y fan de Jara. Una historia que empieza en Gales en los '80, cuando los jóvenes rockeros escucharon una canción de The Clash que nombraba a Jara en un pueblo destrozado por las políticas de Margaret Thatcher y termina hoy con el plesbicito por nueva Constitución de Chile, una Plaza Dignidad repleta y un futuro tan esperanzador como incierto.

Quizás ya comenzaba a imaginar algo de lo que vendría, lo cierto es que James Dean Bradfield era todavía un adolescente de lentes gruesos conseguidos a través del servicio nacional de salud británico cuando escuchó el nombre de Víctor Jara en una canción de The Clash. Corría 1984 en Blackwood, uno de los tantos pueblos mineros del sur de Gales arrasados por las políticas de Margaret Thatcher, y el rock era para él parte esencial de una educación sentimental cursada junto a un puñado de amigos entre libros viejos y planes para escapar. Un par de años más tarde decidieron armar su propia banda, y el resto es historia conocida. Los Manic Street Preachers atravesaron la cultura machista y los aires de derrota de su pueblo con sombras glam, tapados de piel, palabras provocadoras pintadas en stencil sobre remeras y pasamontañas con el nombre escrito en la frente como en un guardapolvo. Cuatro kamikazes de lo más bajo de las castas británicas armados con riffs agresivos y letras creadas con lapiceras y tachaduras en un cut-up de citas sobre cine, literatura, referencias al holocausto, la anorexia, la guerra civil española, un dueto con la estrella porno Traci Lords o arengas contra los principales bancos de su país: la meta era el absoluto y la victoria debía ser absoluta. Pronto se dieron cuenta de que no serían tan famosos como los Sex Pistols, pero eso no impidió que pasaran más de tres décadas con sus propias épicas, tragedias y reinvenciones para la banda, que encontró la manera de sobrevivir a la desaparición del más idolatrado de sus integrantes y se convirtió años más tarde en cabeza de los principales festivales de Gran Bretaña y en la primera banda británica de rock en tocar en suelo cubano. Un camino, finalmente, tan imaginable como cualquier imposible.

Hoy padre de dos adolescentes, Bradfield decidió retomar la posta que recibió de los Clash en su propia adolescencia para homenajear a Víctor Jara a lo grande con Even in exile, su segundo trabajo solista y el primero en lengua inglesa con todas canciones originales inspiradas por la vida y obra del cantautor chileno. Un álbum que en la semana de su lanzamiento alcanzó el puesto número uno en el ranking de álbumes independientes británicos y que, lejos de un homenaje improvisado, es el resultado de un trabajo de dos años que nació a partir de una serie de textos del poeta y dramaturgo Patrick Jones, también amigo de la adolescencia de Bradfield y hermano de Nicky Wire, bajista de los Manics. Y hay más. El disco fue acompañado en su lanzamiento por Inspired by Jara, un podcast de tres episodios donde Bradfield repasa la vida de Víctor Jara y entrevista a artistas de diferentes disciplinas inspirados por el cantautor y director de teatro chileno, desde la actriz Emma Thompson al coreógrafo Christopher Bruce o el cantautor Joey Burns de Calexico. “La obra de Jara es de una belleza diferente a todo”, cuenta Bradfield en el podcast. “Con los años se convirtió en una guía a seguir en todo el mundo, un tipo que creó una obra fascinante en un período en Sudamérica donde la derecha se manifestaba con mucha violencia. Y aun cerca de su final, cuando ya sospechaba todo lo que se venía, su música seguía siendo algo lleno de gracia. Eso realmente me impresionó. Me enseñó que siempre hay algo nuevo para hacer con una canción”.

Even in exile se inscribe en una larga tradición de homenajes que Víctor Jara recibió en los últimos cuarenta y siete años en todo el mundo, desde un ballet creado por un coreógrafo británico a una ópera rock rusa, una biopic alemana, composiciones y versiones de artistas belgas, turcos, japoneses, franceses, suecos, vascos, un festival galés de tres días de duración que cada dos años celebra su legado o incluso el nombre de un asteroide bautizado en su honor por un astrónomo soviético. En Gran Bretaña y los Estados Unidos los homenajes al hijo de campesinos criado en Lonquén se multiplicaron entre bandas y artistas tan populares como The Clash, Robert Wyatt, Joan Baez, Bruce Springsteen, Simple Minds, Peter Gabriel, Roger Waters o U2, y recientemente los Fleet Foxes incluyeron una canción llamada “Jara” en su flamante disco Shore. Pero aun en ese contexto Even in exile asoma como una rareza, el primer álbum de una estrella de rock dedicado por completo al cantautor y director de teatro chileno.

“Al principio se dio medio de casualidad”, cuenta el autor en el podcast. “Patrick había encontrado el disco Manifiesto en una tienda de usados. Le gustó tanto que terminó metiéndose de lleno en la vida de Jara y escribiendo unos textos inspirados en él. Un día de visita en su casa le pregunté en qué andaba y me mostró esos poemas, que no tenía intención de publicar. Desde aquella canción de The Clash, allá por 1984, había vuelto a escuchar el nombre de Jara muchas veces y estaba al tanto del arco trágico de su historia, pero no conocía su música, y quedé fascinado. Fue por lejos el músico que más escuché en estos dos años. Sus canciones son como un encantamiento, un llamado casi espiritual al Chile que tenía en su corazón y su mente”.

Quizás ya comenzaba a imaginar algo de lo que vendría, lo cierto es que James Dean Bradfield era todavía un adolescente de lentes gruesos conseguidos a través del servicio nacional de salud británico cuando escuchó el nombre de Víctor Jara en una canción de The Clash. Corría 1984 en Blackwood, uno de los tantos pueblos mineros del sur de Gales arrasados por las políticas de Margaret Thatcher, y el rock era para él parte esencial de una educación sentimental cursada junto a un puñado de amigos entre libros viejos y planes para escapar. Un par de años más tarde decidieron armar su propia banda, y el resto es historia conocida. Los Manic Street Preachers atravesaron la cultura machista y los aires de derrota de su pueblo con sombras glam, tapados de piel, palabras provocadoras pintadas en stencil sobre remeras y pasamontañas con el nombre escrito en la frente como en un guardapolvo. Cuatro kamikazes de lo más bajo de las castas británicas armados con riffs agresivos y letras creadas con lapiceras y tachaduras en un cut-up de citas sobre cine, literatura, referencias al holocausto, la anorexia, la guerra civil española, un dueto con la estrella porno Traci Lords o arengas contra los principales bancos de su país: la meta era el absoluto y la victoria debía ser absoluta. Pronto se dieron cuenta de que no serían tan famosos como los Sex Pistols, pero eso no impidió que pasaran más de tres décadas con sus propias épicas, tragedias y reinvenciones para la banda, que encontró la manera de sobrevivir a la desaparición del más idolatrado de sus integrantes y se convirtió años más tarde en cabeza de los principales festivales de Gran Bretaña y en la primera banda británica de rock en tocar en suelo cubano. Un camino, finalmente, tan imaginable como cualquier imposible.

Hoy padre de dos adolescentes, Bradfield decidió retomar la posta que recibió de los Clash en su propia adolescencia para homenajear a Víctor Jara a lo grande con Even in exile, su segundo trabajo solista y el primero en lengua inglesa con todas canciones originales inspiradas por la vida y obra del cantautor chileno. Un álbum que en la semana de su lanzamiento alcanzó el puesto número uno en el ranking de álbumes independientes británicos y que, lejos de un homenaje improvisado, es el resultado de un trabajo de dos años que nació a partir de una serie de textos del poeta y dramaturgo Patrick Jones, también amigo de la adolescencia de Bradfield y hermano de Nicky Wire, bajista de los Manics. Y hay más. El disco fue acompañado en su lanzamiento por Inspired by Jara, un podcast de tres episodios donde Bradfield repasa la vida de Víctor Jara y entrevista a artistas de diferentes disciplinas inspirados por el cantautor y director de teatro chileno, desde la actriz Emma Thompson al coreógrafo Christopher Bruce o el cantautor Joey Burns de Calexico. “La obra de Jara es de una belleza diferente a todo”, cuenta Bradfield en el podcast. “Con los años se convirtió en una guía a seguir en todo el mundo, un tipo que creó una obra fascinante en un período en Sudamérica donde la derecha se manifestaba con mucha violencia. Y aun cerca de su final, cuando ya sospechaba todo lo que se venía, su música seguía siendo algo lleno de gracia. Eso realmente me impresionó. Me enseñó que siempre hay algo nuevo para hacer con una canción”.

Even in exile se inscribe en una larga tradición de homenajes que Víctor Jara recibió en los últimos cuarenta y siete años en todo el mundo, desde un ballet creado por un coreógrafo británico a una ópera rock rusa, una biopic alemana, composiciones y versiones de artistas belgas, turcos, japoneses, franceses, suecos, vascos, un festival galés de tres días de duración que cada dos años celebra su legado o incluso el nombre de un asteroide bautizado en su honor por un astrónomo soviético. En Gran Bretaña y los Estados Unidos los homenajes al hijo de campesinos criado en Lonquén se multiplicaron entre bandas y artistas tan populares como The Clash, Robert Wyatt, Joan Baez, Bruce Springsteen, Simple Minds, Peter Gabriel, Roger Waters o U2, y recientemente los Fleet Foxes incluyeron una canción llamada “Jara” en su flamante disco Shore. Pero aun en ese contexto Even in exile asoma como una rareza, el primer álbum de una estrella de rock dedicado por completo al cantautor y director de teatro chileno.

“Al principio se dio medio de casualidad”, cuenta el autor en el podcast. “Patrick había encontrado el disco Manifiesto en una tienda de usados. Le gustó tanto que terminó metiéndose de lleno en la vida de Jara y escribiendo unos textos inspirados en él. Un día de visita en su casa le pregunté en qué andaba y me mostró esos poemas, que no tenía intención de publicar. Desde aquella canción de The Clash, allá por 1984, había vuelto a escuchar el nombre de Jara muchas veces y estaba al tanto del arco trágico de su historia, pero no conocía su música, y quedé fascinado. Fue por lejos el músico que más escuché en estos dos años. Sus canciones son como un encantamiento, un llamado casi espiritual al Chile que tenía en su corazón y su mente”.

El disco no se propone incursionar en los terrenos musicales de Jara: en palabras de Bradfield, para este trabajo tomó cosas de Rush, Pink Floyd, John Cale, los Super Furry Animals o Morricone. En todo caso su influencia se manifiesta en un tono de voz calmo que en muchos temas se funde con la línea de rock para estadios con buenas melodías y arreglos cuidados del último disco de los Manics, Resistance is futile, editado en 2018. La primera canción, “Recuerda”, cita desde su título la letra de “Washington Bullets”, aquella de The Clash en la que Bradfield escuchó por primera vez el nombre de Jara, y de allí en más continúa a lo largo de once canciones en un recorrido narrativo que aborda diferentes aspectos de su vida. La tensión y los ambientes sórdidos en “There Will Come a War” y “Thirty Thousand Milk Bottles” retratan el clima previo y posterior previo al golpe. “Under the Mimosa Tree” sobrevuela la vida familiar de Jara, mientras que tres canciones centrales del disco apuntan a la influencia que tuvieron las mujeres en su vida. “The Boy from the Plantation” narra la conexión con su madre, cantora ella misma en fiestas y velorios que falleció cuando el cantautor era apenas un adolescente. “From the Hands of Violeta” destaca la influencia fundamental que tuvo Violeta Parra en el camino de Jara en el movimiento de la Nueva Canción Chilena (“El mejor cantante del país”, lo llamaba ella cuando Jara no había grabado siquiera su primer disco) y “Without Knowing the End” está dedicada a Joan Jara, esposa de Víctor, bailarina, activista contra la dictadura de Pinochet y autora de una de las biografías más completas sobre Jara, Un canto inconcluso.

“Las mujeres de su vida tienen una enorme influencia en este disco”, apuntó Bradfield en una entrevista reciente. “Entender las historias de Joan, de Violeta y de su madre Amanda resulta clave para entender a Víctor. El hecho de haber crecido escuchando a su madre cantar y tocar la guitarra, la influencia de las composiciones de Violeta Parra, la belleza de las coreografías que interpretaba Joan, todo eso tuvo un impacto muy grande en él. Fue un trabajo difícil preparar el disco con Patrick y tratar de conectar con esa esencia sin por eso imitarlo o simplemente versionar sus canciones, y abordé su obra y la poesía de Patrick con el mismo cuidado casi enfermizo que siempre tuve al crear música para las letras que me pasaron mis compañeros de banda. Al final, el miedo a estropearlo todo siempre me llevó a superarme más que cualquier otra motivación”.

Quizás ya comenzaba a imaginar algo de lo que vendría, lo cierto es que James Dean Bradfield era todavía un adolescente de lentes gruesos conseguidos a través del servicio nacional de salud británico cuando escuchó el nombre de Víctor Jara en una canción de The Clash. Corría 1984 en Blackwood, uno de los tantos pueblos mineros del sur de Gales arrasados por las políticas de Margaret Thatcher, y el rock era para él parte esencial de una educación sentimental cursada junto a un puñado de amigos entre libros viejos y planes para escapar. Un par de años más tarde decidieron armar su propia banda, y el resto es historia conocida. Los Manic Street Preachers atravesaron la cultura machista y los aires de derrota de su pueblo con sombras glam, tapados de piel, palabras provocadoras pintadas en stencil sobre remeras y pasamontañas con el nombre escrito en la frente como en un guardapolvo. Cuatro kamikazes de lo más bajo de las castas británicas armados con riffs agresivos y letras creadas con lapiceras y tachaduras en un cut-up de citas sobre cine, literatura, referencias al holocausto, la anorexia, la guerra civil española, un dueto con la estrella porno Traci Lords o arengas contra los principales bancos de su país: la meta era el absoluto y la victoria debía ser absoluta. Pronto se dieron cuenta de que no serían tan famosos como los Sex Pistols, pero eso no impidió que pasaran más de tres décadas con sus propias épicas, tragedias y reinvenciones para la banda, que encontró la manera de sobrevivir a la desaparición del más idolatrado de sus integrantes y se convirtió años más tarde en cabeza de los principales festivales de Gran Bretaña y en la primera banda británica de rock en tocar en suelo cubano. Un camino, finalmente, tan imaginable como cualquier imposible.

Hoy padre de dos adolescentes, Bradfield decidió retomar la posta que recibió de los Clash en su propia adolescencia para homenajear a Víctor Jara a lo grande con Even in exile, su segundo trabajo solista y el primero en lengua inglesa con todas canciones originales inspiradas por la vida y obra del cantautor chileno. Un álbum que en la semana de su lanzamiento alcanzó el puesto número uno en el ranking de álbumes independientes británicos y que, lejos de un homenaje improvisado, es el resultado de un trabajo de dos años que nació a partir de una serie de textos del poeta y dramaturgo Patrick Jones, también amigo de la adolescencia de Bradfield y hermano de Nicky Wire, bajista de los Manics. Y hay más. El disco fue acompañado en su lanzamiento por Inspired by Jara, un podcast de tres episodios donde Bradfield repasa la vida de Víctor Jara y entrevista a artistas de diferentes disciplinas inspirados por el cantautor y director de teatro chileno, desde la actriz Emma Thompson al coreógrafo Christopher Bruce o el cantautor Joey Burns de Calexico. “La obra de Jara es de una belleza diferente a todo”, cuenta Bradfield en el podcast. “Con los años se convirtió en una guía a seguir en todo el mundo, un tipo que creó una obra fascinante en un período en Sudamérica donde la derecha se manifestaba con mucha violencia. Y aun cerca de su final, cuando ya sospechaba todo lo que se venía, su música seguía siendo algo lleno de gracia. Eso realmente me impresionó. Me enseñó que siempre hay algo nuevo para hacer con una canción”.

Even in exile se inscribe en una larga tradición de homenajes que Víctor Jara recibió en los últimos cuarenta y siete años en todo el mundo, desde un ballet creado por un coreógrafo británico a una ópera rock rusa, una biopic alemana, composiciones y versiones de artistas belgas, turcos, japoneses, franceses, suecos, vascos, un festival galés de tres días de duración que cada dos años celebra su legado o incluso el nombre de un asteroide bautizado en su honor por un astrónomo soviético. En Gran Bretaña y los Estados Unidos los homenajes al hijo de campesinos criado en Lonquén se multiplicaron entre bandas y artistas tan populares como The Clash, Robert Wyatt, Joan Baez, Bruce Springsteen, Simple Minds, Peter Gabriel, Roger Waters o U2, y recientemente los Fleet Foxes incluyeron una canción llamada “Jara” en su flamante disco Shore. Pero aun en ese contexto Even in exile asoma como una rareza, el primer álbum de una estrella de rock dedicado por completo al cantautor y director de teatro chileno.

“Al principio se dio medio de casualidad”, cuenta el autor en el podcast. “Patrick había encontrado el disco Manifiesto en una tienda de usados. Le gustó tanto que terminó metiéndose de lleno en la vida de Jara y escribiendo unos textos inspirados en él. Un día de visita en su casa le pregunté en qué andaba y me mostró esos poemas, que no tenía intención de publicar. Desde aquella canción de The Clash, allá por 1984, había vuelto a escuchar el nombre de Jara muchas veces y estaba al tanto del arco trágico de su historia, pero no conocía su música, y quedé fascinado. Fue por lejos el músico que más escuché en estos dos años. Sus canciones son como un encantamiento, un llamado casi espiritual al Chile que tenía en su corazón y su mente”.

El disco no se propone incursionar en los terrenos musicales de Jara: en palabras de Bradfield, para este trabajo tomó cosas de Rush, Pink Floyd, John Cale, los Super Furry Animals o Morricone. En todo caso su influencia se manifiesta en un tono de voz calmo que en muchos temas se funde con la línea de rock para estadios con buenas melodías y arreglos cuidados del último disco de los Manics, Resistance is futile, editado en 2018. La primera canción, “Recuerda”, cita desde su título la letra de “Washington Bullets”, aquella de The Clash en la que Bradfield escuchó por primera vez el nombre de Jara, y de allí en más continúa a lo largo de once canciones en un recorrido narrativo que aborda diferentes aspectos de su vida. La tensión y los ambientes sórdidos en “There Will Come a War” y “Thirty Thousand Milk Bottles” retratan el clima previo y posterior previo al golpe. “Under the Mimosa Tree” sobrevuela la vida familiar de Jara, mientras que tres canciones centrales del disco apuntan a la influencia que tuvieron las mujeres en su vida. “The Boy from the Plantation” narra la conexión con su madre, cantora ella misma en fiestas y velorios que falleció cuando el cantautor era apenas un adolescente. “From the Hands of Violeta” destaca la influencia fundamental que tuvo Violeta Parra en el camino de Jara en el movimiento de la Nueva Canción Chilena (“El mejor cantante del país”, lo llamaba ella cuando Jara no había grabado siquiera su primer disco) y “Without Knowing the End” está dedicada a Joan Jara, esposa de Víctor, bailarina, activista contra la dictadura de Pinochet y autora de una de las biografías más completas sobre Jara, Un canto inconcluso.

“Las mujeres de su vida tienen una enorme influencia en este disco”, apuntó Bradfield en una entrevista reciente. “Entender las historias de Joan, de Violeta y de su madre Amanda resulta clave para entender a Víctor. El hecho de haber crecido escuchando a su madre cantar y tocar la guitarra, la influencia de las composiciones de Violeta Parra, la belleza de las coreografías que interpretaba Joan, todo eso tuvo un impacto muy grande en él. Fue un trabajo difícil preparar el disco con Patrick y tratar de conectar con esa esencia sin por eso imitarlo o simplemente versionar sus canciones, y abordé su obra y la poesía de Patrick con el mismo cuidado casi enfermizo que siempre tuve al crear música para las letras que me pasaron mis compañeros de banda. Al final, el miedo a estropearlo todo siempre me llevó a superarme más que cualquier otra motivación”.

La pregunta desató las risas de todos, banda, ministros, asistentes y medios de prensa cubriendo el encuentro: “¿Más ruido que en la guerra?”, soltó rápido de reflejos Fidel Castro a sus 74 años de edad cuando Bradfield le advirtió que iban a hacer mucho ruido durante el show de los Manic Street Preachers en La Habana. Fue el 17 de febrero de 2001, un hito que para el trío oriundo de Gales coronaría la ambición de sus comienzos –cuando eran cuatro– de devolver el rock a las arenas políticas en medio de la apatía generacional de los noventa. Una épica gestada a partir de la mente caótica y brillante de Richey Edwards, licenciado en historia política, letrista, segundo guitarrista (aunque no sabía tocar mucho) y, como ellos mismos lo llamaban, ministro de propaganda de la banda. Richey desapareció sin dejar rastros en 1995 (a los 27 años de edad) tras haber sido la mente maestra detrás del tercer álbum de la banda, el ilustrado y monstruoso The Holy Bible, hoy considerado uno de los más importantes de los noventa en Gran Bretaña y uno de los cantos de cisne más oscuros y confrontativos en la historia del rock: “El sonido de una banda acelerando hacia su propio Armagedón”, lo describió el biógrafo Simon Price. Esa desaparición continúa siendo un misterio hasta el día de hoy. Seis meses después de haber editado The Holy Bible, tras una breve estadía en un psiquiátrico a causa de sus severas tendencias depresivas, Richey le regaló a una amiga una novela cuya introducción narraba la historia de su autor, que había desaparecido sin dejar rastros tras estar internado en un psiquiátrico. La noche siguiente viajó en taxi hasta una estación de servicio cercana a un puente sobre el río Severn –conocido por la cantidad de suicidios que tenían lugar allí– y luego ya nadie volvió a saber de él. Entonces comenzó el mito. Algunos fans dijeron haberlo visto en un bar en las Canarias, otros en un mercado en la India. Tras intensas búsquedas policiales alentadas por su familia, Richey fue declarado muerto en 2008.

Hasta su desaparición, los Manics habían sido disidentes de cualquier espacio en el que se los pretendiera ubicar. En las primeras entrevistas aseguraban que dos de sus grandes influencias eran los Guns N’ Roses y los under londinenses con letras políticas McCarthy (banda de la que se salieron Tim Gane y Laetitia Sadier de Stereolab), a la vez que disparaban contra todas las movidas británicas más grandes de su generación, sea el shoegaze, el madchester o el britpop. Pero tras la desaparición de Richey se fue también la intención de llevar todo a un extremo que escapara incluso al control de la banda. Nicky Wire (el más cercano a él, al punto de que los llamaban “The Glamour Twins”) se hizo cargo a partir de entonces de las letras, y en 1996 los Manic Street Preachers regresaron con Everything must go (Todo debe partir). Ya desde el título del álbum, los sonidos de agua con los que abría el disco y el nombre del primer tema, “Elvis Impersonator” (“Imitador de Elvis”), el ahora trío dejaba en claro el lugar que para ellos ocuparía la banda sin Richey. El segundo track de ese disco, “A Design for Life”, fue el primero que compusieron tras su desaparición: “Las bibliotecas nos dieron poder/ y el trabajo nos hizo libres/ ¿cuál es el precio ahora/ por un pedazo vacío de dignidad?”, arrancaba el tema, mientras que la canción siguiente, “Kevin Carter”, abordaba la historia de un fotógrafo ganador del Pulitzer que se quitó la vida tras haber sido criticado por tomar una foto en lugar de intervenir frente a una posible tragedia. En apenas tres temas la banda se hacía cargo de su presente, pasado y futuro con esa feroz lucidez de siempre donde lo político y lo personal se fundían con el dolor, la rabia y la cultura pop, sumándole la fuerza emotiva desencadenada por su historia y las lecturas inevitables que buscarían a Richey en cada canción.

Everything must go fue una bisagra. Los galones marginales cambiaron por nominaciones y premios en los MTV Music Awards o los Mercury Prize y se convirtieron en el acto principal de festivales como el Glastonbury, sin por eso alejarse del camino que habían llevado hasta entonces, algo que les permitió meter en enero del 2000 un puesto número uno con un single llamado “The Masses Against the Classes” (que arranca con una cita de Chomsky y cierra con una de Camus) y grabar unos años más tarde una versión guitarrera del hit de Rihanna “Umbrella” como lado B del exitoso Send away the tigers. El exorcismo definitivo de su pasado llegó en 2009 con Journal for plague lovers, producido por Steve Albini y compuesto a partir de letras de Richey que habían conservado. De allí en más la banda entró a su tercera década decidida a embarcarse en una nueva reinvención, arrancando con el ambicioso y liberador Postcards from a young man (con participaciones de Ian McCulloch y Duff McKagan), incursionando en el folk y el soul con vetas pop de Rewind the film (con Cate Le Bon como invitada) o entregándose al optimismo sin perder la mirada crítica en Futurology, inspirado por el arte y la música que descubrieron en sus viajes por el mundo. “Al principio éramos dos bandos que nos complementábamos”, contó alguna vez Bradfield. “Por un lado estaban Richey y Nicky, que querían explotar en un solo disco y luego desarmar la banda, y por el otro estábamos Sean (Moore, su primo, baterista de la banda) y yo, a quienes nos gustaba pensar en una carrera extensa como músicos. Con todo lo difícil que fue, se sintió bien cuando a mediados de los noventa decidimos continuar”. Al igual que The great western, el disco solista anterior de Bradfield, editado hace catorce años, Even in exile aparece en medio de una pausa que se tomaron los Manic Street Preachers antes de entrar a grabar su próximo trabajo. “Nick y Sean quisieron tomarse un descanso, pero yo no puedo”, contó. “Soy un músico institucionalizado, de solo pensar en no hacer nada me daba un ataque de pánico. Cuando Patrick me mostró los poemas sobre Jara sentí que podía convertirlos en un disco conceptual. Ahí fue cuando me metí de lleno en su mundo”.

Even in exile incluye un solo tema de Víctor Jara, “La Partida”, una de sus canciones más versionadas a pesar de ser instrumental. Pero esto no sorprende. Más allá de su capacidad natural para las melodías y los arreglos, Jara siempre se preocupó por la calidad musical de su obra, y su formación como director de teatro lo llevaba a aprovechar al máximo los recursos a disposición para que la ambientación de cada pieza recreara el clima ideal de las historias que decidía contar (el ejemplo más grande en ese sentido quizás sea su álbum La Población, una obra conceptual acerca de una toma con influencias de Sgt. Pepper en cuanto al uso creativo del estudio de grabación). “La Partida” pertenece a El derecho de vivir en paz, el primer disco en el que incluyó guitarras eléctricas y teclados. Para esto fue fundamental la participación de Los Blops, una agrupación de psicodelia folk barroca por la que Jara había intercedido un año antes cuando la discográfica de la Juventud Comunista, fundamental para la difusión de la Nueva Canción Chilena, había rechazado financiar su disco porque en las letras de la banda no había referencias explícitas a la revolución popular. Jara no solo logró que Los Blops editaran allí su primer disco sino que además los invitó a ser la banda que lo ayudara a electrificar su sonido. “La Partida”, tercer track de El derecho…, es un llamado a la valentía a la vez etéreo y contundente, dos acordes arpegiados al charango que resuenan oníricos en sus variaciones de intensidad y un rasgueo seco punk de furia contenida en el medio. Una composición que sería retomada en una memorable versión por los Inti Illimani dos años después del secuestro y asesinato de Jara, cuando la interpretaron en vivo en la televisión italiana (el registro fílmico de esa versión está en YouTube).

La versión de Bradfield es más grandilocuente, resalta el aura de spaghetti western del original y aun en sus diferentes capas de arreglos es más afín a ese rock de estadios al que es afecto el galés. En el podcast cuenta: “Me decidí por esa canción porque sus palabras y su voz tienen una carga tan grande que sentí que no debía meterme ahí, pero quería incluir una pieza suya. Traté de cantar ‘Manifiesto’ y ‘Te Recuerdo Amanda’, entre otras, pero cada vez el resultado me dejaba desalentado. Me escuchaba y me sentía como un envase vacío, y fue entonces cuando decidí grabar esta canción. Los instrumentos del original, el charango, el tiple, la quena, tienen un tono algo triste que en esta versión decidí amplificar para llegar a una visión más espectral, por llamarla de alguna manera. Hay una foto de Jara en el Templo de las Tres Ventanas en Machu Picchu que fue tomada en su última gira por Perú, poco antes de su asesinato. La imagen es impresionante, y fue mi inspiración más grande para la canción”.

“Santiago Sunrise”, el tema que cierra Even in exile, fue a su vez el último que grabó para el álbum. Lo hizo mientras seguía las protestas masivas que tuvieron lugar en Chile hace un año, las cuales dieron lugar al histórico triunfo en el plebiscito del domingo pasado a favor de reformar la constitución heredada de la dictadura. “Your spirit will guide us to Plaza Italia” (“Tu espíritu nos guiará hasta Plaza Italia”), se escucha sobre el final disco. “Ver a tanta gente cantando y tocando en la calle canciones de Víctor Jara fue de verdad emocionante”, señaló Bradfield. “La música de protesta suele ser confrontativa, pero lo suyo no es música de protesta. Es otra cosa. Infiltró belleza en las trincheras políticas. Eso me llevó a intentar comunicarme con otra gente en lugar de simplemente confrontar, y en esta época donde la oposición a la derecha está tan dividida me pareció importante escribir sobre él, alguien que buscaba unir antes que separar. Al final quizás sea esperanzador, ¿no? Algo que viene de tantos años atrás y deja una marca tan grande en un viejo cínico y cabrón como yo”.