Gigography: 1986 | 1987 | 1988 | 1989 | 1990 | 1991 | 1992 | 1993 | 1994 | 1995 | 1996 | 1997 | 1998 | 1999 | 2000 | 2001 | 2002 | 2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014 | 2015 | 2016 | 2017 | 2018

Home.jpg Albums.jpg Lyrics.jpg
Forum Singles.jpg Radio.jpg Merchandise.jpg
Links.jpg Videos.jpg Articles.jpg

Trials, Truths And Transit Vans - Real Groove, October 1998

From MSPpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
ARTICLES:1998



Title: Trials, Truths And Transit Vans
Publication: Real Groove
Date: October 1998
Writer: John Russell


In a suite at New York's Marriott Hotel, Sean Moore, drummer with the Manics Street Preachers, is lounging on his bed, "watching 56 channels of mind polluting shite on the telly". Spending time in America on a publicity tour, the band have also been doing rehearsals for their forthcoming UK and European tours.

Late last month, the Manics unveiled their fifth first single from the album debuted at number one in the UK charts, suggesting the band are set to repeat rampant commercial success they've enjoyed in recent years. Up until 1996, major league fame and fortune had eluded the Manics, but the year they released 'Everything Must Go', their first album since the still unresolved disappearance on band member Richey James. The record was unstoppable and Moore and his cohorts, Nicky Wire and James Dean Bradfield, became million selling international rock stars, but more importantly, they kept their dignity and integrity intact.

Now, the band who arrived on the scene in the late 80's with the declaration, "We want to be the most important reference point of the 1990's, that's all" are looking for another 15 minutes. Moore shares the agenda with Real Groove.


CONGRATULATIONS ON THE NEW ALBUM, THERE'S SOME REAL POWERFUL TUNES ON THERE.
"Yeah. thanks. That's the strength of the Manic Street Preachers, we always try to write beautiful songs."

IT SEEMS LIKE A LOT OF PEOPLE HAVE BEEN GEARING UP TO BE DISAPPOINTED BY THIS RECORD.
"Yeah, I know what you mean. People have been very sceptical, they don't seem to think that we could come up with an album to beat 'Everything Must Go'. We never look at it like that, we always just try and do one better than we did last time'

ARE YOU SAYING THERE WAS ZERO PRESSURE TO COME UP WITH THE GOODS?
"When we were recording there was no pressure whatsoever, but now that we've had four months to dwell on things, the pressure is on. We're waiting to see if people will accept the first single as readily as 'Design For Life' and whether the album will be immediate. 'Everything Must Go' took a while for people to get into it and we worry that 'This Is My Truth Tell Me Yours' might take even longer."

HOW DOES 'THIS IS MY TRUTH...' COMPARE TO EVERYTHING MUST GO?
"It's more concise lyrically, and musically it's much more diverse and beautiful. We spent a lot of time with the arrangements of the songs and the instrumentation. Throughout our history, right from 'Generation Terrorists' through to 'Gold Against The Soul' and 'Holy Bible', we've always tried to use different instruments and different ways of recording, so hopefully this is a progression from the last album."

IS IT A RECORD RICHEY WOULD BE INTO?
"Well.....first and foremost I always try to please myself, I'm hypercritical of myself and the band, so if I can please myself, hopefully it will please a lot of other people. I'm so meticulous down to the point where it becomes, to most people, tedious. I'll ponder over every single beat and bar to make sure it's pleasing to me. I'd like to think that Richey would like the last album and this album, but for reasons beyond our control we'll never know."

WITH THE TRIALS OF THE PAST FEW YEARS, WHAT HAS KEPT THE BAND SO SOLID?
"We've never been a band about egos, we've always seen ourselves as the Manic Street Preachers. I remember when Richey disappeared, someone asked us if we still thought we were the Manic Street Preachers without him, we said that if a person loses a limb, they're still a person, and that's all that we see for ourselves, we've lost a limb. We're still very true and honest to ourselves and that's the thing that's most important to us."

I'VE READ THAT YOU"RE GOING BACK TO YOUR ROOTS AND DOING A TRANSIT VAN TOUR VERY SOON.
"Yeah, that's what we're trying to do in the UK. In September we're playing small theatres and travelling around in a van, because in December we're playing a huge arena tour where we'll be playing to 10,000 people every night."

WHAT'S GOING ON MUSICALLY IN THE UK RIGHT NOW? WHAT CYCLE ARE YOU ON?
"At the moment there isn't really anything happening, we're almost in a downward spiral. The record companies are after a quick return, so they go for the manufactured boy group/girl group pop thing, like Boyzone and the Spice Girls for example. At the moment in the UK there tends to be a reaction against the serious group where there's a lot of time and alot of investment involved, the record companies tend not to want to take a risk. The thing that really disappoints me is the lack of imagination that record companies have at the moment."

CAN YOU NAME THE MOST SIGNIFICANT LESSON YOU'VE LEARNT IN THE LAST FOUR YEARS?
"The biggest thing I've learnt is to appreciate just life, that lie is such an important thing. Especially young people are so blase, there's almost this invincibility, they think they can do absolutely anything and nothing can touch them. People should embrace and appreciate life as fully as possible and take every opportunity there is and fulfil every ambition and dream to the full."

WHEN YOU'RE NOT INVOLVED IN BAND CARRY-ON, WHAT ARE YOU DOING DAY TO DAY THAT REFLECTS WHAT YOU'VE JUST SAID?
"I live a very simple life, really I like to do a bit of gardening and look after my animals. Nick's much the same, for him, utopia is at home with his family. He feels like he can experience the world from his armchair and that's what makes him happy. For me, I really enjoy travelling and I really enjoy meeting other people, the bit I don't enjoy is the flight, I think it's the most unnatural thing in the world. You have this huge aluminum machine that just throws itself into space...I just find aeroplanes scary. I wouldn't go as far as to say a phobia, it's just a dislike."

THERE'S AN AUSTRALIAN CRICKETER, DAVID BOON, WHO DRANK 68 CANS OF LARGE ON A TRIP FROM LONDON TO SYDNEY, HE CLAIMED TO BE TERRIFIED OF FLYING.
"{Laughter} He's a great batsman, but hell 68 tinnies!! I don't think we've ever got through that amount, but I can definitely sympathise with him. This is a bad example but just the other day on MTV they had a news item about the blonde singer from Ace Of Base, she lost her voice through fear of flying...Nicky thought it was the most perfect thing in the world."