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This Is One Festival Nicky Wire Doesn't Want To Build A Bypass Over... - NME, 30th August 2008

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ARTICLES:2008



Title: This Is One Festival Nicky Wire Doesn't Want To Build A Bypass Over...
Publication: NME
Date: Saturday 30th August 2008
Writer: Nicky Wire



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"This festival has been hugely important for us. Growing up as kids it was THE festival and we were totally in awe of it. When we first played in '92 it was the first time we played 'Motorcycle Emptiness' and we felt like we'd arrived.

We went down really well, or so it seemed because we went down so badly everywhere else! I smashed my guitar and went to throw it in the crowd; it hit one security guard, dislocated his shoulder and then whacked another security guard on the head. I immediately ran off the site to the train station with my brother.

We played for the first time without Richey when he was in hospital, but bizarrely it was really, really good. We had to pay his bills so we couldn't pull out. But the best time ever was when headlined in 1997 and I got the cover of NME in my see-through dress! 'Everything Must Go' had been out for 12 months, Kylie was in our dressing room and it just felt like the culmination of everything. With that camouflage dress, It remember I was in a hotel in Reading all day trying to work out what kind of pants I should wear, was in my room jumping around seeing how it'd look. I went for a pair of Calvins but they were a bit loose. In the dressing room when Kylie came in had to put a pillow over myself! There's a real energy here, that's the difference. There's a sense of abandonment. This time, we played 'You Love Us' and it was like, 'Fuck me, you actually do!'"