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Every Picture Tells A Story: Manic Street Preachers - Q Magazine, April 2018

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ARTICLES:2018



Title: Every Picture Tells A Story: Manic Street Preachers
Publication: Q Magazine
Date: April 2018
Writer: Niall Doherty
Photos: Martyn Goodacre, Kevin Cummins



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Manic Street Preachers by Martyn Goodacre, 1991

"The Manics arrived at my place in Elephant & Castle driving a red Ford Mondeo and wearing anoraks that covered their homemade sloganeering attire. Richey Edwards had a page out of the A-Z London map book taped to his shirt, which I thought was pure brilliance. They were warm, friendly, very endearing and fabulous company. "Philip Hall, their manager, had perceptively given me a whole afternoon to shoot them, so we went to Buckingham Palace and then back to the Old Kent Road where I lived, mainly because I had an appointment with my spliff dealer who lived in a nearby high-rise. I thought the balcony would be a good background. "Unfortunately, Nicky Wire's vertigo kicked in and the shoot was short-lived. James Dean Bradfield later wrote about the day, 'The state of his place!! What a dump!?' And Nicky wrote that he thought journalists and photographers all lived in mansions and was never jealous of the 'poor sods' ever again."

Some of Cummins's best work features black-and-white shots of serious young men with furrowed brows, great hair and the weight of the world on their shoulders. His striking portrait of Manic Street Preachers' Richey Edwards from August 1994 captured the guitarist in the pits of despair, or at least that's how it looked. "Nicky Wire looked at him there, with his eyes closed, almost crying, holding onto this statue, and said, 'Fucking hell, Edwards! You'd do anything to get on the cover of the NME, wouldn't you?' Richey started laughing."