Twitter-icon.pngFacebook-Icon-Large.pngInstragram.pngPeriscope-1.0-for-iOS-app-icon-small.png

HOME.jpg ALBUMS.jpg LYRICS.jpg TV.jpg VIDEOS.jpg
FORUM.jpg SINGLES.jpg ARTICLES.jpg RADIO.jpg MERCHANDISE.jpg


Gigography: 1986 | 1987 | 1988 | 1989 | 1990 | 1991 | 1992 | 1993 | 1994 | 1995 | 1996 | 1997 | 1998 | 1999 | 2000 | 2001 | 2002 | 2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014 | 2015 | 2016 | 2017 | 2018 | 2019


A Real Manic Tripp - Nettavisen, 22nd March 2001

From MSPpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
ARTICLES:2001



Title: A Real Manic Tripp
Publication: Nettavisen
Date: Thursday 22nd March 2001
Writer: Mari Bangstad


"We grow older, but the mind remains young." Manic Street Preachers is in Norway on the promotion tour with its sixth and best track.

Manics is about to end the advertisement for "Know Your Enemy" and we meet drummer Sean Moore on the morning newspaper.

"Sorry if I'm a little tired, but the trams rattled like that tonight," says a traditionally low-key Moore. The drummer in Manics usually leaves frontman James Dean Bradfield and songwriter Nicky Wire takes care of the press meetings.

Difficult to get Moore in speech, however, is not. Manic Street Preachers has been known for its political left-wing commitment ever since its inception in 1992 and is one of the few modern bands that have managed to keep on this commitment for almost a decade. Manic Street Preachers have always stood outside the "celebrity world" and never been dodging rock stars.

Now they are out with "Know Your Enemy", also called the trio's political testament. Recently, Manics made a historic concert in Cuba, where they met Fidel Castro in their own person. Much has been written and said about the appearance and the meeting. Moore himself says that the incident was a small demonstration against the US's lies and the use of Cuba as a playground. Americanization throughout the world, he gladly demonstrates, but does not hide the fact that it's easy to be blown when you're up to the music.

Manics has repeatedly repeated that this last album came as a reaction to the previous commercial success, "This Is My Truth, Tell Me Yours."

"It was not an honest record, but we did not realize that afterwards. We all felt we had to show who we really are and what we stand for. I think this album represents, says Moore. The recording of "Know Your Enemy" took unusually long time and, according to Moore, represents honesty, integrity and dedication.

"There are too few people in the Western world who emphasize these qualities. We see a general trend where people have stopped asking questions about all that happens. People need ideas and people need to ask questions.

Moore admits that it has been difficult to hold on to the commitment of Manic's success and the privileged situation of the band members.

"We had to make this for our own sake, for our own self-esteem. Call it selfish, we needed it at least.

"We do not want to be a band like U2 or Rolling Stones, who are in the same street year after year.

"Our record company is going to release a" Greatest Hits ", and then another record will be added. Now we are back to the beginning of the band with "Know Your Enemy". (Which includes rock, pop, and disco approaches). The next new had to be a rip?

Moore sets a cheerful expression. "We're leaving Robbie Williams to try it out!

But before that: Festivalspilling. As soon as the promotion is over, the fun part of the music circus comes.

"We will make all the festivals we have time for - not Roskilde because then we have another job. Quart can be, and at least the Hultsfreds festival in Sweden will be visited.